Safety is top priority at Berendsen

In the Danish laundry and textile services group, Berendsen, Clean Room business with washing, rental and maintenance of clean room clothing and accessories among other things, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device and food industry across Europe has grown steadily in recent years.

Berendsen employs 800 people in clean room business in 11 laundries throughout Europe, and the volume means that the Director of Operations, Clean Room, Berendsen, Camilla Kondrup look closely at the next steps.

“Our primary motivations to invest in new equipment is that we are always working to enhance safety and quality in all our processes in Clean Room laundries, both in the handling of dirty clothes and equipment, washing and cleaning and packing and distribution,” says Camilla Kondrup.

Automatization for safety at working place

“We have business from the pharmaceutical industry, where they work with what we call the hazardous liquids”. Although our employees obviously wear special equipment when they sort and handle the clothes, there is a particular risk profile by working with these subjects. Among others, our clients count pharmaceutical companies working with development of various types of virus,” remarks Camilla Kondrup, who for that reason is considering whether X-ray technology and automated sorting can reduce the risk factor in clothes management.

“Our employees handles a lot of garments from the pharmaceutical industry, so we have full focus on maintaining maximum security. In time, we could consider robots to do the first handling of the laundry on arrival and to separate the garments, and we could perhaps also take full advantage automating other processes or the entire laundry operation. In the best world, we had no contact with certain types of clothing and equipment,” Camilla Kondrup continues.

In addition to the safety aspects of the work, Berendsen, like any other laundry, are working on how to further improve the quality of washing and handling of clothing and items in the future.

“When people are involved, there is always greater a possibility of errors than if sorting is fully automated and based on RFID-chips. If I must list the priorities of our investments, it is first and foremost about risk management. Next, it is about proper sorting. And finally, we are obviously keen on streamlining our processes with automation,” Camilla Kondrup concludes.

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